Brexit should mean Irexit

February 20, 2018

Another reason to leave the EU is the deluge of propaganda typical in the following poll

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/fine-gael-support-surges-on-back-of-brexit-row-1.3318116

This gives Fine Gael at 36% up 5%. This is the latest Irish Times/Ipsos MRBI opinion poll!!

I don’t know how these polls are conducted but I believe they need to be investigated rigorously to probe impartiality!

The hospital trolley crisis continues unabated with hospitals at dangerous crisis point throughout the country. Homelessness continues to be on the increase.

“PTSB, still 75pc owned by taxpayers, shocked the market this week when it emerged efforts to mop up its balance sheet were far more drastic than anticipated.

It involves the disposal of some 20,000 impaired residential mortgages.” This would mean a huge rise in homelessness. I’m guessing none of the above were polled by Irish Times/Ipsos MRBI opinion poll.

There was a suggestion that the following offer to landlords could be extended to homeowners in arrears, however it appears Fine Gael and the banks perhaps influenced by the large number of td’s who are landlords, will get a more favorable deal than if they were thrown to the wolves in the vulture funds.

There is also evidence to suggest Frankfurt is putting pressure on Irish banks to sell to vulture funds. This writer has frequently pointed out the policy on homelessness is dictated from The ECB in Frankfurt contrary to what the government and the Irish banks would have you believe.

The ECB through the imposition of fiscal limits the so-called fiscal space determining our budget prevents the investment in our housing infrastructure required to solve our homelessness crisis.

Such large-scale investment would make housing affordable but reducing the cost of housing would risk current borrowers falling into negative equity leading to investment flowing out of casino housing and property the implications of which would collapse the banks.

https://www.independent.ie/business/personal-finance/property-mortgages/bank-to-write-off-debts-of-more-than-1000-landlords-under-deal-36597051.html

Meanwhile local developers will not invest in large-scale construction because of the excessive building costs and that affordability issue making the selling on of such property as unviable.

Fine Gael enjoy the surging support mentioned above on foot of not reducing the cost of land through restructuring of our planning laws and reducing the huge tax it takes on construction such as the large vat rate that does not exist across the water in the UK.

Authors of the debacle of Irish water, the sell off to the vulture funds, the failure to negotiate a fair bailout, are now authors of 10 Priorities of the National Planning Framework, Project Ireland 2040, on foot of a lack of satisfactory progress to deal with the issues of the day as eg above, bring us their dreams of the future.

Of course this is misdirection to take attention away from the clear and present danger of crises that do not reflect well on governance in Ireland 2018. Its a ploy tried by many failed African and South American and East European formerly USSR states who promise nirvana and deliver its opposite.

Fine Gael are busy with their latest project managing Brexit. They will gladly sacrifice Irish farming to build and pay for the new border with its huge cost dictated to us by the Michel Barnier French politician leading EU negotiations on Brexit.

He will ensure costs against France and Germany are not exposed to possible losses by Ireland: in the Financial collapse where 40% of losses of the total EU losses were shafted onto Irish shoulders, he’s busy sending signals to us that there will be a hard border.

Varadkar and Coveney unable to defend their own people mistaking their interests for the interests of Irish banks and vulture funds are preparing to sacrifice rural Ireland, just as they have sacrificed tens of thousands of homeowners to the banks.

Meanwhile propaganda and misdirection continues, whether it is the 8th Amendment  debate that censors discussion on the provision and cost of hospital services and the cost to the Irish taxpayer, or the abandonment of those in mortgage arrears, or the lack of real debate and preparation for Brexit.

There is some debate but it’s largely nonsensical such as the effort of Fine Gael suggestion last November that the only way to avoid a hard border in Ireland was, essentially, for Northern Ireland to remain inside, or as close as possible to, the customs union and single market. The Irish border would move off the island into the Irish Sea.

Since then Coveney and Varadkar have made fools of themselves over devolved government in the North to the point of visiting NI anticipating this announcement.

The term dim-witted comes to mind. Often this term has been leveled at Brexiteers as anti Brexit propaganda:

The Sunday Times:

“Those who voted ‘leave’ are often dismissed as dim or racist. But now some of Britain’s top academics and thinkers — from the left and right — have banded together to put the positive political and economic case for independence

Brexit supporters are overeducated toffs who dream of ruling the waves and biffing Johnny Foreigner. Or they are racist proles too dim to see through the lies of the Brexit campaign. Either way, they have one thing in common — they are all, every one of them, as thick as the slowest-witted plant in your garden.

That link between low IQ and a Brexit vote is now an entrenched ideology among many, if not most, remainers. You hear it at dinner parties, you see it on television, you read it in frothing newspaper columns and you can detect it in the fear of professional or private exposure among many “leave” voters.

But, from today, Brexiteers can come out of the closet and hold their heads high. They will know that they have the support of Nigel Biggar, professor of theology at Oxford; Sir Richard Dearlove, former head of MI6; David Abulafia, professor of history at Cambridge; and Sir Noel Malcolm of All Souls, Oxford. In fact, they will have the support of 37 of the brightest people — both from the left and the right — in the land. And soon there will be many more of them.

The list is due to appear because a pair of Cambridge academics, one leftish, one rightish, were sick of the vilification of Brexiteers, the distortions of the remainers and of being “deluged with one-sided propaganda”. In a calm, professional egghead sort of way, they’re mad as hell, and they’re not going to take it any more. “I thought of it during one of those terribly pessimistic weeks,” says the economist Graham Gudgin, of the Judge Business School at Cambridge, “when Theresa May wasn’t going to last until teatime and there was definitely going to be a second referendum. Together we thought, ‘Gosh, we ought to be better organised than at the last referendum.’”

“It was,” says Robert Tombs, emeritus professor of French history at Cambridge, “the whole tide of propaganda about how awful everything was, how awful everything was going to be, and we didn’t believe this. We realised quite a lot of other people didn’t believe it either.”

They are dismayed by the contempt for Brexiteers shown by remainers. “Graham and I have working-class or lower middle-class backgrounds,” says Tombs. “I do feel you just can’t write off a large part of the population as being unworthy of consideration.”

Together they have designed a website — briefingsforbrexit.com — that will go live in the next few days. The mission statement makes it clear this is an assault on the too-thick-to-vote theory of Brexit. By word of mouth the news got out and, without a word of publicity, they suddenly found they had a pantheon of super-smart supporters. “I’ve been surprised by how many people found out about it and came on board quickly,” says Gudgin. “We would not have known about them unless we set this up.”

They are fully independent: the website is the only cost, and Gudgin paid for that. The anti-Brexit campaign is not independent; it has just received £400,000 from the financier George Soros. “[His] support for the pro-remain campaign shows there is a lot of big money behind hardline remainers, whose interests have little to do with the interests of the country as a whole,” says Tombs. “It shows that independent, self-funded initiatives like ours are all the more important. The other important news is the selective leaking of unsourced statistics; this shows again how much expert scrutiny is needed.”

Sadly, some Brexiteer academics were afraid to join Briefings for Brexit. “They said, ‘I’d love to be part of your group but I haven’t got a proper job yet and I probably won’t if I’m identified.’”

“One of our contributors said he was told by a younger pro-Brexit colleague that his professor had told him that people who voted Brexit were the sort of people who sent his relatives to concentration camps,” says Gudgin.

For the same reason, some of the authors of essays on the site will be anonymous. Tombs says he had one pro-Brexit student who did not dare to say anything to her supervisor because he claimed all Brexiteers were racists. “I thought one thing we academics were paid to do was help explain things to people, but universities have become so simple-minded about this.”

Also self-interested. Tombs points out that universities get a lot of money from the EU, adding: “So many of our colleagues had wrongly taken a corporatist, selfish and narrow view.”

Gudgin and Tombs are an odd couple. Gudgin has the air of a former fast bowler, tall and lanky with a loose suit and tie; Tombs looks like an opening batsman, more buttoned-up, a continental intellectual. Gudgin votes Labour and has some time for Jeremy Corbyn; Tombs voted Liberal Democrat last time around and Tory before that. Gudgin is the economic technician, Tombs the big-picture historical analyst. Both are old enough to have voted remain in the 1975 referendum. Both did so on the basis they were voting for a free trade area. What they got was a nascent superstate hell-bent on absorbing all power into its own bureaucracy.

“To every crisis that comes along, the answer is always more centralisation, never less,” says Tombs.

Gudgin’s anger was driven primarily by economic distortions. At the time of the referendum there were two Treasury reports. The first was short term. It forecast that a vote for Brexit would produce an instant recession; in fact, the only thing that was instant was the refutation of the thesis by reality; we continued to have comfortable growth. The glaring flaw in the short-term report was a figure plucked out of the air. The Treasury wonks simply assumed the loss of business confidence would be 50% of the loss of confidence during the banking crisis. This was ridiculously high.

“It looks like most of the errors in the short-term report have been repeated in last week’s report from Dexeu [Department for Exiting the European Union],” says Gudgin. This was a leaked paper from the Brexit secretary David Davis’s Dexeu showing massive falls in growth in most regions of the UK. It did not show who had done the work or how it was done; it is uncheckable and, therefore, irrelevant in academic terms. In any case, Gudgin says, the figures are ludicrous.

The second report at the time of the referendum made long-term forecasts, and it has proved more enduring. It was very pessimistic. Gudgin says it is still the source of most remainer claims by television pundits and Europhile politicians. Tombs agrees: “The original paper has kind of coloured the whole debate.”

But Gudgin and a team of four economists — three of them remainers — proved its assumptions wrong back in 2016. They tried to organise a meeting but the Treasury “absolutely refused to meet”. They wrote letters to the Financial Times, but they were not published.

The errors were important but, perhaps, too technical to grasp. One showed the Treasury wonks had failed to take account of the fact that Britain is almost the only EU state that has more trade outside the EU than inside. This distorted downwards the forecast on trade. “They calculated the amount of extra exports to EU countries due to being an EU member, but took an average across all EU members rather than measuring the specific effect for the UK,” says Gudgin. “They then assumed all the gains would be lost on leaving and that no replacement exports would occur via new free-trade agreements. These are extreme assumptions and led the Treasury to an exaggerated estimate of the impact of Brexit.”

The other assumed a close correlation between growth and productivity, but the assumption was based on just two papers that found a link in emerging economies. There was no link in developed economies. Were these errors, I ask Gudgin, or deliberate massaging of the numbers? He says there are issues of civil service integrity and of scientific “sins”.

About the two reports at the time of the referendum, he says: “I was told not to be naive. The chancellor was George Osborne, and he was strongly anti-Brexit. The civil servants were asked to do a major report. What other conclusion could they come to?”

Gudgin, however, does not agree with the strong, ideological Brexiteers on the free-market right when they claim there will be an economic boom arising from our ability to trade freely without EU restrictions. By 2030, he predicts a Brexit fall in GDP growth of about a quarter of 1%, but no effect whatsoever on the much more important GDP per capita — the effect on us individually. But still the voices of Brexit disaster have the microphone. “Nobody who appears on the BBC and says ‘This is going to be a catastrophe’ is ever asked what their view is based on,” says Gudgin.

Tombs’s analysis is more political. A celebrated historian of France, in 2014 he published The English and Their History. It was, among many other things, a rejection of the postwar declinist narrative that has dominated the lives of three generations. “By the standards of humanity as a whole,” he wrote, “England over the centuries has been among the richest, safest and best-governed places on earth, as periodical influxes of people testify. Its living standards in the 14th century were higher than much of the world in the 20th. We who have lived in England since 1945 have been among the luckiest people in the existence of Homo sapiens: rich, peaceful and healthy.”

The postwar, post-imperial decline of Britain — one of the driving forces behind our decision to join the EU — is an illusion. Yet in the 1960s and 1970s it was treated as established fact. When we joined the EU (then the EEC) in 1973 it was in a state of panic. Britain, it was said, was the Titanic and Europe our lifeboat.

“I think, speaking as a historian and as a patriot, that we were taken into the EU on a misunderstanding of our situation,” says Tombs. “It would have been better in the 1960s and 1970s to continue to ask for a free trade agreement. I don’t think most people understood the full implications of what we were signing up to politically.”

Part of that illusion was economic, the belief that growth in the EEC was outstripping ours. In fact that growth rate ground to a halt soon after we joined because it was based on a quarter-century of recovery from the Second World War. We were actually doing rather better than Europe. “We looked at the record of growth in per capita GDP since 1952,” says Gudgin, “and growth was better before we joined the EU than after.”

Politically, Tombs now sees the EU as imperilled by its own mania for centralisation. He had hesitated to vote “leave” because he foresaw the chaos among politicians and the civil servants that would ensue. “But the reason I eventually voted to leave was because I think the EU is either going to break up, and break up very badly, or at least dissolve into a dysfunctional confederation of non-co-operative members, or it will become — and France’s President Emmanuel Macron has stated this very clearly, to his credit — much more centralised, and not through conventional politics. The European parliament is not the way in which it could work or, indeed, is being envisaged to work. It will become a much more bureaucratic system in which power is exercised through banks and government bureaucracies, not through a normal process of political discussion.

“We’ve seen how that works in Italy and Greece: a political choice is defeated by sheer weight of economic pressure — if you do this, your currency or economy will collapse. I don’t think that would last and I don’t see how it could have a good end. I don’t think we either want to be, or ought to be, a party to that.”

Gudgin adds — and the left should pay attention — that a fully united Europe would have a hopelessly poor social security system as the Germans and others would not be willing to support welfare for the Greeks and southern Italians.

Both despised the way each side conducted the referendum campaign and how lies and manipulation contributed to the current rancorous social and political divisions. The dishonesty left a persistent residue of anger and mutual contempt that poisons and obscures debate.

So there you have it. A Brexit vote is not a symptom of low IQ any more than it is of racism. Brexiteers should wave the list of names on briefingsforbrexit.com the next time remainers sneer at them.

On a personal note, I voted to remain, having been unsure to the last minute. I disbelieved the economic arguments; I thought them rigged. I just believed that, maybe, the EU could ensure peace in Europe for another generation. Briefings for Brexit has knocked that one down. Tombs points out that Nato and nuclear weapons have done more to keep the peace than the EU, and a paper on the site will show that the EU has stirred up more wars than it can ever have stopped.

“Instead of peaceful integration,” writes Philip Cunliffe, a senior lecturer in international conflict at Kent University, “the eastward expansion of the EU has disproved its claim to reunify the Continent and shattered its legitimacy as a peacemaker.”

In a new referendum I would vote “leave”. It’s the smart option.

It’s right to leave: the great minds thinking alike

ECONOMISTS
Dr Graham Gudgin
, Judge Business School, Cambridge
Paul Ormerod, visiting professor at University College London

PHILOSOPHERS/THEORISTS
Nigel Biggar
, regius professor of moral and pastoral theology, Oxford
Paul Elbourne, professor of the philosophy of language, Oxford
Dr Tom Simpson, associate professor of philosophy and public policy, Blavatnik school of government, Oxford

LAWYERS

Ruth Deech
Ruth DeechBEN GURR

Sir Richard Aikens, QC, former member of the Court
of Appeal
Baroness (Ruth) Deech, former chairwoman of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority
Dr Richard Ekins, associate professor in law, Oxford
Carol Harlow, QC, emeritus professor of law, London School of Economics (LSE)
John Tasioulas, professor of politics, philosophy and law at the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London
Guglielmo Verdirame, professor of international law, King’s College London

FOREIGN POLICY/DIPLOMACY/DEFENCE
Dr Philip Cunliffe
, senior lecturer in international conflict, University of Kent
Sir Richard Dearlove, former head of MI6
John Forsyth, former member of the council of the Royal Institute for International Affairs
Dr Lee Jones, reader in international politics, Queen Mary University of London
Sir Peter Marshall, formerly deputy secretary-general of the Commonwealth
Gwythian Prins, emeritus research professor at the LSE
Dr Philip Towle, emeritus reader in international relations, Cambridge
Sir Andrew Wood, former ambassador to Russia and a fellow at Chatham House

SOCIAL POLICY
David Coleman
, emeritus professor of demography, Oxford
Jonathan Rutherford, emeritus professor of cultural studies, Middlesex University
Dr Joanna Williams, author/academic

PSYCHOLOGY
Dr Terri Apter
, former senior tutor, Newnham College, Cambridge
Robin Dunbar, emeritus professor of evolutionary psychology, Oxford

BUSINESS
Alexander Darwall
, Jupiter Asset Management
Sir Paul Marshall, chairman of ARK Schools
Rory Maw, Bursar of Magdalen College, Oxford
Dame Helena Morrissey, Legal & General Investment Management
Edmund Truell, chairman Disruptive Capital Finance
David Abulafia, professor of Mediterranean history, Cambridge
Sir Noel Malcolm, fellow of All Souls College, Oxford
Dr Daniel Robinson, fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford
Dr Peter Sarris, reader in late Roman, medieval and Byzantine studies, Cambridge
Robert Tombs, emeritus professor of French history, Cambridge

NATURAL SCIENCES
Dr Ian Winter
, senior lecturer in the department of physiology, development and neuroscience, Cambridge

POLITICAL SCIENCES AND GOVERNMENT
Lord (Maurice) Glasman
, Labour peer and director of the Common Good Foundation
Robert J Jackson, professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, and emeritus professor at the University of Redlands, California
Richard Tuck, professor of government, Harvard University”

In Ireland:

Instead of homelessness, no affordable homes for young people, dismantling of the agri sector in Ireland, hospital trollies, the smarter option is to join with Britain in Brexit, look to unification of NI and Southern Ireland and work for a UK arrangement similar to NI, Wales, Scotland and England with a new Ireland joining the commonwealth. 

FDI here is global and FDI won’t leave because of Brexit alone again contrary to claims of the contrary.

We need Irexit.

The alternative is a vassal state enslaved by France and Germany who will ruthlesslessly
dismember and loot this country to save its own financial sector.

Financial collapse and its fallout since 2010 through austerity is only the precursor of a much larger loss to this country if Brexit brings a hard border with tariffs, falling value of sterling that will break exports.

Eventually leaving Ireland more divided  than it ever was before.

As a vassal state of the EU we will not even be able to comfort ourselves with false notions of our sovereign independence long since handed over to the troika and the ECB.

Our role in the governance of the EU through parliamentary MEP’s will be more of an empty vessel than it has been ever before.

Think of how Greece and Cyprus have moved in terms of their own sovereignty under the EU..

The loss of billions in revenue each year to Ireland….

https://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/unique-brexit-exposure-could-cost-ireland-billions-each-year-467105.html

https://www.revenue.ie/en/corporate/documents/research/brexit-and-the-consequences-for-irish-customs.pdf

Instead of focusing on a Planning Framework up to 2040, perhaps more preparation for Brexit 2018/2019 is in order…

Instead of empty vessels making the most noise.

 

 

…..till again

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Irexit

December 2, 2017

“He added: “As the British Government has ruled that option out it must offer credible, concrete and workable solutions that guarantee that there will be no hard border whatever the outcome of the negotiations.

“As we discussed today, the period between now and the European Council meeting in two weeks’ time will be crucial – indeed, the next couple of days. So we don’t have long, but I believe that with the right engagement and with the right political will we can reach an agreement on the way ahead.”

Mr Varadkar’s ‘agreement’ is likely to coincide with John Bruton’s view below that the UK should not leave the customs union! This is both naive and foolhardy as it ignores the certainty of Brexit for Ms May’s government who have repeatedly stated Brexit means Brexit means leaving the customs union.

But Mr Varadkar warned: “I am also prepared to stand firm if the offer falls short.” ”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-donald-tusk-ireland-uk-offer-eu-britain-leo-varadkar-a8087556.html

Shirking its responsibility to come up with a solution to Ireland’s border problem with Brexit Donald Tusk head of the European Council passes the buck to Ireland’s Trojan horse.

Tusk is President of the European Council since 2014 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Tusk .

Ireland does not have a seat at the negotiating table of the EU for talks with the UK.

It’s not in the interest of the EU to lay out a policy document and agreement with the UK over Brexit as this weakens EU and could be a template for other leave campaigns should they arise after the UK. There are compelling reasons for Italy, Spain, Portugal and Cyprus to leave.

In Ireland anti Brexit sentiment among political parties is at its highest.  For example http://johnbruton.com/category/brexit/  John Bruton describes how leaving the EU puts Brexit in conflict with the Interlaken principles of the EU. Of course it does. They are leaving not joining the EU.

Brutonbelieves a solution to the border problem is that the UK should not leave the customs union and it should agree to a 6 year interim Brexit period during which he hopes the UK can be persuaded to change its mind.

Bruton and the EU and Ireland are practiced in multiple referendums until the result they want is forcibly achieved. No longer espousing democratic principles the will of the people regarded as malleable or an indifferent inconvenience that is easily subverted.

The principle of democracy with Brexit demanding the UK leave the customs union is strongly defended by the UK.

Fudging of Brexit demands that the UK reconsider its position is weakening the possibility of an agreed solution that won’t impose a hard Brexit.

Let me put forward a solution that will maintain the Irish Republic in the EU. If the EU made an initial spend of 50bn euro to support Ireland during Brexit this would make the spend on our population of approx 5,000,000 at 10,000 euro per person.

Currently https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/business/news/northern-ireland-public-spending-highest-in-uk-14020-per-head-35747632.html , NI has the highest public spend in any region of the UK with approx 15000euro per person.

This would compensate us for loss of trade and provide for our border out of public funds.

MrTusk and fellow European politicians have not been talking of any financial support for Ireland. Perhaps negotiators can enlighten us on why this is so.

Following our financial collapse and bailout we did not even get a ghostly presence of European politicians but we did get threatened by the bailout team supported by EU politicians who demanded terms that horrified the IMF.

It would appear post Brexit Ireland would have to be raised to the status of a protectorate and thus financial support for our loss is required.

It’s a tragedy that the Irish border will reemerge as a reminder of this divided island and divided people.

Withour common heritage and vast diaspora in the UK we should be leaving the EU with Brexit invoking an Irexit that can unite north and south and the UK.

The south has been a huge loss to the north and visa versa. We need northern Ireland politicians and southern Ireland politicians to bring this island forward rather than backward into a broken past.

Irexit will not mean MNC’s leaving Ireland. MNC’s are global in their sales. Irish farmers would continue to sell into the UK and worldwide. A free trade agreement with the EU will need to be agreed. Irish educational institutions and universities and public services especially healthcare would require upgrade and harmonisation with our UK counterparts.

Alas the political will and talent for examining the benefits of Irexit as opposed to remaining in the EU under the likes of Irish Water’s Phil Hogan keep the media in myopic tunnel vision focused on remain with the topic of leaving kept out of public discourse.

A few years of the consequences of Brexit for this island may leave it too late to get a better deal for Ireland leaving the EU.

Meanwhile we lurch blindly towards the nightmare destiny of the island of Cyprus rescued by EU bailin of depositors money in its banks recently following financial collapse of Cyprus.

Post Brexit we can easily become “…the Republic of Cyprus is de facto partitioned into two main parts: the area under the effective control of the Republic, located in the south and west, and comprising about 59% of the island’s area; and the north,[24] administered by the self-declared Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, covering about 36% of the island’s area. Another nearly 4% of the island’s area is covered by the UN buffer zone.

The international community considers the northern part of the island as territory of the Republic of Cyprus occupied by Turkish forces.[25][26][27][28][29] The occupation is viewed as illegal under international law, amounting to illegal occupation of EU territory since Cyprus became a member of the European Union.[30]” 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyprus

What a mess Irish politicians are making and they are making it bigger.

 

till again……………

Ireland’s Berlin Wall

February 12, 2017

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny has met with Polish Prime Minister, Beata Szydlo. He got no support from Beata Szydlo in his quest for Ireland to be given special status in coming Brexit negotiations.

In his belief that Ireland must be imaginative re its response to Brexit, it might have been useful to visit Poland’s border with the Ukraine. Delays of up to 4 hours for border control for those travelling by train between both countries.

Depending on the purpose of visit,  the vehicle you are travelling in,  papers carried, security checks, crossing the border might take an hour or so; or you might need to join the lengthy kilometers long grid lock of vehicles that appears not to move at all and is worse than Calais.

Construction and manning of these border control check points perhaps Kenny might have an imaginative word …”former head of the European Commission’s customs procedures has told MPs. Michael Lux told the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee that customs controls on the Border will be unavoidable if the United Kingdom leaves the EU customs union after Brexit”(1)

Crossing the Polish border into Ukraine you have to pass through the Polish border then the Ukraine border. Smuggling of goods particularly cigarettes are big issues. Perhaps Poland’s refusal to accept refugees is also an issue.

If Kenny is soft on the border between Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland could Ireland become a mecca for refugees fleeing Calais. Border patrols on our coastline would have to be stepped up to combat people smuggling and a growing refugee crisis in Southern Ireland may require special European funding arrangements.

People smugglers may resort to parachuting in their delivery of human cargo by night.

By day boats ill-suited to Mediterranean waters may navigate dangerous waters hoping to reach Southern Ireland before crossing over to Northern Ireland.

It would appear inevitable that a wall will need to be built.border-fence-cartoon

The cost of this wall could be astronomical. Much resentment would be felt by many pointing to our…. housing and homelessness crisis.

Walls have a habit of keeping people in as well as keeping people out. At current rates and if further devaluations occur brought about to make the UK economy even more competitive, the thousands travelling north on an hourly basis to stock up on lower price goods, could be delayed at the border, then further delayed on way back to process import duties and other checks….

2. Currently about one out of every 4 litres of milk consumed in the south comes from Northern Ireland amounting to over 600 million litres per year.

That’s a lot of trucks requiring paperwork sensitive to any delay or waiting game.

“IFA chief economist Rowena Dwyer broke down Ireland’s relationship with the UK in numbers at the IFA’s briefing on Brexit recently. 50% of Ireland’s total beef exports goes to the UK, followed by one-third of our total dairy exports. With the UK leaving the EU, a drop in Irish exports of between €150m to €800m can be expected.”(3)

With the collateral damage of border controls I believe the figures above are vastly understated. But it’s not only border controls at Norther Ireland its border controls at points of embarkation/demarcation between Ireland and the UK in general border crossing points both at land and sea.

Currently within the Irish media or at a political level in spite of the abjuration of Enda Kenny there is no imaginative or otherwise setting down of the precise implications of Brexit. A small group led by Kenny himself is handling Brexit.

We’ve had a cabinet setting up of an all-Ireland dialogue on Brexit but nothing concrete has emerged. Its imagined that Kenny is visiting fellow EU leaders to drum up support for Ireland’s special position in regard to Brexit.

But perhaps no one apart from Kenny knows what Ireland’s special position on Brexit amounts to? Is Kenny asking that a standing army of customs officials, construction companies, be provided by the EMU to police Ireland’s new borders with the UK, for free?

 

On the face of there are no plans other than to bury the head in the sand and hope for the best. Kenny is about to bow out of politics so the fall out wont effect him much, but it will affect the rest of us.

So let’s answer Kenny’s call for us to be imaginative. Let’s demand answers that put down on the table what exactly will happen with Brexit and what the fallout will be for each Mary and Joe citizen living on this island.

The only way to effectively do this is to call a referendum on IRexit to give each citizen in the Republic a vote on whether to stay in the EU or leave. There are profound implications which should force the facts to the surface and allow each citizen to make their choice.

One imaginative solution if Irexit was chosen would be to consider the Cyrpus situation. Turkish occupation of northern Cyprus has been an issue since 1974. In recent years the following proposed solution is emerging:

“The UN plan for settlement (Annan Plan)

'Sorry! I've changed my mind.'

‘Sorry! I’ve changed my mind.’

Under the final proposals, the Republic of Cyprus would become the United Cyprus Republic. It would be a loose federation composed of two component states. The northern Turkish Cypriot constituent state would encompass about 28.5% of the island, the southern Greek Cypriot constituent state would be made up of the remaining 71.5%. Each part would have had its own parliament. There would also be a bicameral parliament on the federal level. In the Chamber of Deputies, the Turkish Cypriots would have 25% of the seats. (While no accurate figures are currently available, the split between the two communities at independence in 1960 was approximately 80:20 in favour of the Greek Cypriots.) The Senate would consist of equal parts of members of each ethnic group. Executive power would be vested in a presidential council. The chairmanship of this council would rotate between the communities. Each community would also have the right to veto all legislation”

The US, the UN, UK and IR have all had deep involvement in finding solution for the conflict in Northern Ireland.

One solution would be for this island instead of building walls to adopt a solution along similar lines to the Annan Plan above. Ireland would form itself into a loose confederacy of states with Scotland, Wales and England operating under a similar umbrella of trade, legal, constitutional and social. Instead of this island being the Irish Republic, it would change to The United Ireland Republic.

Surely the above road is better than a road that promises imminent collapse of our banks, destruction of our social services, ruination of our agri industry, all to make this a smugglers paradise or Pirate Island for foolish politicians…..

Postscript

There needs to be a criminal investigation led by an external police authority outside this country to pursue those who engineered and executed the dirty tricks campaign mounted against whistle blowers including Garda McCable that has lasted for many years corrosively in An Garda Siochana covered up with inaction from the Department of Justice and now spread to other state organisations.

The handling of the above by this Fine Gael led governent rivals the incoherent way it has approached and currently prepares for Brexit. There is no reason to assume the incoherent opposition led by FF will in any way improve on matters.

 

Till again…………….

 

  1.  http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/may-s-border-promises-are-nice-words-says-ex-eu-customs-head-1.2959694
  2. http://www.agriland.ie/farming-news/ireland-set-to-import-record-levels-of-milk-in-2015/
  3. http://www.farmersjournal.ie/implications-for-irish-agriculture-if-british-cast-a-brexit-ballot-212787
  4. http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/cabinet-sets-up-all-ireland-group-to-prepare-for-brexit-1.2816034

IRexit

January 23, 2017

Listening to Ireland’s pitch for financial services located in London to locate in Dublin following Brexit  must be like listening to the German government during World War 1 or WW11 pitching to non participants in the conflict to set up embassies  located somewhere near the Maginot or Siegfried lines of national defence just as the shells begin to fall. (1)

Eoghan Murphy minister for state (for Brexit) asked on Morning Ireland 23.01.17 if he was asked during his pitches  at various forums around the world trips at taxpayers expense if property prices in Ireland would pose a problem, stated that the subject was not raised once. I humbly suggest the reason for this was that no one in their right mind was contemplating relocating to Dublin.(1a)

Falling land prices make the price of an average dwelling in the Dublin suburb is similar to the price of a 50 acre farm outside Dublin.

This is before Brexit will wipe out 50% of exports to UK of agri-production with UK opportunities to outsource their requirements at lower prices perhaps in new trade deals with Brazil/New Zealand et al.

With English the universal language of commerce, science and financial services the value of Ireland being English-speaking is moot.

(2) “Frankfurt

On mainland Europe, Germany’s financial district would be an obvious choice to replace London – and has the added global reach that Dublin lacks, UBS said.

Already home to the European Central Bank, the Bundesbank and several global financial services firms such as Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank, the EU’s biggest economy is well primed to pick up where London might leave off, despite having stricter labour laws than the UK.

The city is already preparing for an influx of 10,000 or so bankers over the next five years – and those from London can look forward to cheaper living costs and shorter commutes.

Frankfurt also boasts the third-largest airport in the EU, with excellent transport connections across the world, and has an office vacancy rate twice that of Dublin at around 12pc, with half a million square metres of work space available in the city centre. ”

Both Amsterdam and Paris are contenders having short hops to London and Frankfurt and good infrastructure.

Dublin in the austerity grip of disappearing public services, greater political upheaval potential as the divide between rich and poor increases, looming turmoil especially in the agriculture sector due to repossessions as yields fall because of Brexit, is not an attractive venue following the triggering of Brexit under article 50.

(2) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/news/which-cities-could-replace-london-as-europes-financial-centre–a/

Preparations for Brexit are personalised in Ireland around the dictated orders of the european_dis_integration__alexander_dubovskyDepartment of An Taoiseach:

“Yet the taoiseach and his secretary general Martin Fraser have kept firm control of Brexit policy, and appointed John Callinan, another civil servant with Brussels experience, as second secretary in Government Buildings. They set up a Brexit cabinet subcommittee under the chairmanship of Kenny and including several senior ministers. A Brexit working group is chaired by Fraser and includes top officials from the departments of foreign affairs, finance and public expenditure, as well as the IDA, Enterprise Ireland, the attorney general’s office and other agencies” (Sunday Times, 22.01.17 P8)

In one way it makes sense to have the Taoiseach lead negotiations over Brexit as when the Irish economy begins to splutter and shut down and the smugglers’ Black economy between north and south grows, held together by the illicit sale of smuggled cigarettes and cheap agricultural produce defying new border controls, Kenny can be slipped into retirement.

But it looks like the above group is a waste of time, effort and money. Better use could be made of the group sourcing new markets for Irish exports, negotiating directly with a committee from the UK parliament on common needs.

In the wake of the financial collapse of the economic project of the EU that has led to Brexit, the collapse of peripheral economies across Europe, banking collapse dangers in Italy, a collapse that will be further consolidated by emigration policies and further austerity with imminent closure of Irish corporation tax loopholes, we should ignore An Taoiseach’s efforts over Brexit tilting at windmills as apparently he is also ignored across Europe.

If unfortunately we choose to stay as appears to be the case perhaps the above group can produce a report of the effects of Brexit for Ireland, how Europe will compensate Ireland for such losses. Such pertinent questions will not be mooted by Ireland’s swans as they swim in the vast and resplendent halls of Val Halla,  in Brussels…at taxpayers expense.

If we had even the semblence of a true democracy in Ireland given the implications of Brexit for Ireland, results should be put before the people in a referendum for Irexit.

Europe has failed having fallen victim to the abuse of global financial services that may lead to global collapse of the financial services industry…but that is a topic for another day.

Visiting London not so long ago, I was surprised by the vast number of cranes across the centre of London, the vast numbers of tourists, the UK economy filled with positive energy was far from collapse.

(1) http://general-history.com/the-siegfried-and-maginot-lines-similarities-and-differences/

(1a) http://www.irishtimes.com/business/financial-services/minister-urges-assertiveness-to-attract-post-brexit-business-1.2946870