Ireland’s Big Lie

March 20, 2016

Many in Ireland are calling for government intervention in the housing and homelessness crisis. More social and private housing needs to be built to end waiting lists. Some argue the crisis will get a lot worse with upwards of 70000 in danger of losing their homes as vulture funds up their rents further while they continue their profiteering rampage.

Tunnel of Love/Lover's Leap.

Tunnel of Love/Lover’s Leap.

The Construction Federation of Ireland have said(1):

“The market price of many homes throughout the country is still well below the all-in construction cost. In a report commissioned by the IHBA from Walsh Associates, Construction Cost Consultants in 2014, the construction cost of a 3 bedroomed semi-detached house of 110 sqm is calculated at €225,961, in addition to site costs plus VAT at 13.5%.  According to the Daft House Price Report 2015 published today, the average asking price for houses in Carlow is €140,536, in Offaly it’s €138,247, while in Westmeath the average asking price is €145,804. Clearly, as long as sales prices for these houses are below replacement cost, the market will not support significant increases in the construction of new homes. As long as this situation prevails, little to no new housing will be built in these areas.

“The IHBA agrees that more housing is needed to meet the national demand.  However it is up to all stakeholders including government, banking, regulatory and development sectors to ensure that a viable construction environment is supported to ensure that this critical objective can be achieved.”

(2)”The Irish League of Credit Unions has offered the Government a €5 billion fund, which could be kept off the State’s official borrowing figures, to build thousands of homes over the next six years.

The league, which represents 437 credit unions and has savings in excess of €11 billion and total assets of more than €13 billion, has told the Government it currently has “surplus” funds of up to €8 billion.”

Stakeholders are asking that government take the reins and join the dots to lead and to create a much-needed housing programme to end the current crisis.

Yet the offer from the credit unions has been with government since last October with little or no response. Neither have Fine Gael Labour in their election manifestos warmed to the advance of the credit unions with election commitments to invest.

Each RTE programme, each media item on homelessness dwells on the thorny subject of last of investment, lack of planning, too great a government tax take while blame is handed from one agency to the other with no one seeing the wood from the trees.

Thus a large cover up has grown covering up the real cause of  our homelessness and housing crisis.

The real cause of our housing and homelessness crisis lies at the door of government compliance and obedience to the dictates of the Irish Central Bank. In fact, so great is the coverup that it has morphed into the biggest LIE perpetuated against the Irish people since the emergence of our state in 1916.

This LIE feeds upon and perpetuates complexity where none exists, it apportions blame elsewhere, it lies in the background concealed behind economic home truths that shame both Irish politicians and the people they represent. When Ireland was poor, vast housing estates on the periphery of Dublin city were built. Even in poverty, people had a place to live and affordable accommodation. Shamefully thousands of families are about to experience emergency accommodation unsuitable for families especially children.

Clearly credit unions have the money to invest over and above their reserve requirements see page 80 (3) However, the billions in assets of credit unions exist on deposit in major Irish banks and as deposits they are part of the reserve requirements or Irish banks under the umbrella of the Irish Central Bank.

Deposits of Irish Credit unions are being used to shore up a system of lack of investment in Irish property. There is no appetite in government to use these deposits to threaten an Irish banking loan book dependent on high prices and anathema to the ideals of affordable housing/social housing.

Furthermore, investment in the building of affordable housing in Ireland will compromise the investment liquidity of vulture funds in Ireland perhaps encouraging a quicker turnover of these assets and a fire sale.

The fragile nature of the mortgage sector in Ireland with billions in outstanding loans in negative equity means banks cannot afford a drop in prices causing further negative equity and a large threat to their outstanding loan book.

Many are against a large scale building programme as this may eat into their potential profits. Deposits of the credit unions are there to shore up the banks and will not be allowed freedom to invest in aspects of the Irish economy requiring sovereign investment.

Guarding against this will be the task of a puppet government tasked with defending the 1% against the 99%.

In this scenario of ‘fragile recovery’ its easier for the Irish Central Bank to lie and point to other reasons for the Irish homelessness crisis, to sing as Rome burns.

On the above count alone, there is reason to renegotiate our loan book with the ECB and look to an Irish exit from the EU along with Brexit.

At least this would give our children and next generation a home to live in. Or not be saddled with 40% of the euro cost of the financial crisis to European banks.

Clearly the Irish Central Bank ICB has neither the will nor the way to stand up for this country in its dealings with the ECB. While Irish politicians and most of the media seem happy enough to paddle homelessness and our housing crisis over the waterfall.

till again.

(1) http://cif.ie/news-feed/news/628-response-to-minister-kelly-commentary-on-social-housing-development.html

(2) http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/credit-unions-offer-government-5bn-housing-fund-1.2577604

(3) https://www.centralbank.ie/about-us/Documents/ICURNCreditUnionPeerReviewReport_July2015.pdf

Advertisements

5 Responses to “Ireland’s Big Lie”

  1. My blog said

    I don’t do this regularly. Thank you for your post! It is exceptionally composed and makes some
    excellent points. Subscribed.

  2. My blog said

    It’s not common for me to see articles that are in the same class as yours.
    I shared this on my facebook. Many thanks to you
    for posting this!

  3. Ahmed said

    It’s not very often that I get to enjoy articles that are as awesome as yours.
    I shared this on my instagram. Thank you for posting this.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: